What’s the identity of your church? What do outsiders really think of you? A handful of old ladies listening to boring sermons? Full of ‘happy clappy’ worshippers singing choruses? What kind of identity would you like your church to have? The book examines some ways of improving your identity and creating a ‘logo’ that helps your church to promote that image, and gives some examples. Here are some more:

KingslogoKings Church in Portsmouth uses this logo of people worshipping, which gives you a good idea of its lively, charismatic style of praise and worship. It cleverly also looks like a crown, which fits in with the church’s name.

This logo also appears outside the church building itself (see above). Hopefully anyone receiving literature from this church would consciously or sub-consciously connect it with the building that they may walk past each day.

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The way you use colour is important even if you only use one colour! Note here how a lighter and darker version of a single colour can be used to give the impression that a logo is more colourful than it is. Note also the use of the two people holding hands, giving the impression that St Faith’s Community Church is a caring community.

YourOffice_Buildings_9 logo should also reflect the reality of your church’s location. There’s no point having an image of a rural idyll if your building is in an inner-city location – or vice versa. Here’s an example of a logo where a cross has been created by using high-rise blocks of flats. This should help those who live near City Church relate to the church more easily.

It’s possible to create a modern-looking logo from even the most traditional of starting-points. Here the crest for the Anglican Diocese of Portsmouth was updated to create a fresher, more modern feel. A complicated crest was simplified and made to look less stuffy, while the font used for the lettering, and the use of black and grey also helps. The use of strongDiocese_of_Portsmouth_9D041 colours adds to the impact.

What about your church? Does its literature feature a logo, or a consistent image that means that people know it all comes from the same place?